Mother of Invention

A Twelfth Planet Press anthology

Category: News

Open Call Author Acquisitions!

In addition to the pieces already commissioned from our fabulous tentpole authors, we are thrilled to announce our new acquisitions from the open call submissions. In alphabetical order by story title, they are:

  • “Arguing with People on the Internet” – E.H. Mann
  • “A Robot Like Me” – Lee Cope
  • “Junkyard Kraken” – D.K. Mok
  • “Knitting Day” – Jen White
  • “New Berth” – Elizabeth Fitzgerald
  • “Rini’s God” – Soumya Sundar Mukherjee
  • “Sugar Ricochets to Other Forms” – Octavia Cade
  • “The Ghost Helmet” – Lev Mirov
  • “The Goose Hair of One Thousand Miles” – Stephanie Lai
  • “Tide Falling, Falling Tide” – Meryl Stenhouse

We can’t wait to share them with you, and we’re excited to be working with these authors. So many great stories were submitted to our book, and we were sad we couldn’t accept all the ones we loved — many of which we expect to see popping up in other publications because they were so good.

We’ll be releasing a full Table of Contents before the end of the year, including story titles from our tentpole authors and a proper running order, but Rivqa & Tansy are leaving for Genrecon today and wanted to give you this exciting news update on the project.

It’s all happening, you guys. We’re making a book!

Mini-MOI interview: E.C. Myers

We had a quick chat with one of our Mother of Invention authors, E.C. Myers. If you’ve backed our Kickstarter, drop us a comment here by 30 June, 5pm AEST (that’s 3am  EDT and midnight PDT) . You’ll need to include the name you used on Kickstarter so that we can verify your details. You’ll go in the running to win a signed copy of E.C. Myers’ novel, Fair Coin (postage within the continental U.S. only).

 

No spoilers, of course, but can you tell us one cool thing about your Mother of Invention story?

I love anime, and a classic show I used to like (which in retrospect is horribly flawed, as it was targeted toward pubescent boys) is Video Girl Ai. It’s about a “video girl”, a VHS tape with a recording of a girl named Ai Amano which is intended to encourage lonely men–only this girl comes alive, a la Weird Science. (See what I mean about it being problematic?) This series didn’t inspire my story, but it’s been bubbling up in my subconscious as I write it. In many ways, I’m writing the reverse of the premise of Video Girl Ai… more along the lines of Video Girl AI.

Tell about your favourite fictional AI or robot (from any medium!).

That’s an easy one. My favorite fictional robot is the Iron Giant from Brad Bird’s criminally underrated animated film of the same name. The message of the film is incredibly moving: “You are who you choose to be.” And as sappy as it may sound, every time I watch the movie, without fail, the ending brings me to tears.

What else have you published/worked on recently (or have forthcoming)?

My latest publication is a collection of short stories linked to my Silence of Six series titled 1985: Stori3s from SOS, which is from Adaptive Books and exclusively available at Barnes & Noble. I have short stories forthcoming in several anthologies all due in the fall: Where the Stars Rise: Asian Science Fiction and Fantasy (Laksa Media), Behind the Song (Sourcebooks), and Feral Youth (Simon Pulse). I’m also currently co-writing season two of ReMade, a science fiction serial from Serial Box Publishing, which features some interesting and disturbing AIs in various incarnations.

E.C. Myers was assembled in the U.S. from Korean and German parts. He has published four novels and short stories in various magazines and anthologies, most recently 1985: Stori3s from SOS. His first novel, Fair Coin, won the 2012 Andre Norton Award for Young Adult SF and Fantasy. [Twitter]

Mini-MOI interview: Jo Anderton

We had a quick chat with one of our Mother of Invention authors, Jo Anderton.

No spoilers, of course, but can you tell us one cool thing about your Mother of Invention story?

It’s inspired by kintsugi, and I think kintsugi is cool.

If you could invent a robot or AI, what would its capabilities be?

I’m all for the self-driving cars, and I’d make sure they were actually polite drivers too. Sydney could use some of that.

What else have you published/worked on recently (or have forthcoming)?

Well, it’s completely different, but I have a children’s book coming out early 2018. It’s called The Flying Optometrist, it has the most beautiful illustrations (done by the amazing Karen Erasmus, not me!) and it’s totally unrelated to robots or AI or SFF in general. But it’s super exciting!

Jo Anderton writes speculative fiction for anyone who likes their worlds a little different. She sprinkles a pinch of science fiction to spice up her fantasy, and thinks horror adds flavour to everything. She has won the Aurealis, Ditmar and Australian Shadows awards. [Twitter]

Mini-MOI interview: Cat Sparks

We had a quick chat with one of our Mother of Invention authors, Cat Sparks. If you’ve backed our Kickstarter, drop us a comment here by Thursday 8 June, 5pm AEST (you’ll need to include the details you used on Kickstarter) and you’ll go in the running to win a signed copy of Cat’s novel, Lotus Blue (postage within Australia only).

No spoilers, of course, but can you tell us one cool thing about your Mother of Invention story?

Mach, one of many seemingly identical bioceramic Legionnaire-350 war machines, has taught itself to lie and steal in an effort to protect itself, its maker and the future. Because when it comes to dealing with humankind, there doesn’t seem to be another way.

Tell about your favourite fictional AI or robot (from any medium!).

Bishop from Aliens. I love Bishop, possibly at least in part because I adore Lance Henriksen, the actor who portrayed him so convincingly. Bishop is gentle, soft-spoken and kind. There’s a considered innocence about him coupled with strength, both physical and emotional. If I were ever stranded in deep space, I would choose him as my artificial person companion.

What else have you published recently?

My debut science fiction novel, Lotus Blue, was published earlier this year. The titular character is an artificial intelligence, a war machine waking up in an ecologically ravaged future Australia trying to find a way to get back to doing what it does best.

Recently, my short story “Prayers to Broken Stone” was published in Kaleidotrope. I’d class it as dark literary fantasy – very different from my usual kind of thing.

Cat Sparks is a multi-award winning Australian science fiction and fantasy author. Cat grew up in Sydney, has a BA in Visual Arts and is finishing a PhD examining the intersection of science fiction and climate fiction. She was Fiction Editor of Cosmos magazine for five years and managed Agog! Press from 2002 to 2008.  Seventy of her short stories have been published in various magazines and anthologies including The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror, Year’s Best SF 16, Loosed Upon the World, Solaris Rising 3 and Lightspeed Magazine. Lotus Blue, her debut novel (Skyhorse, 2017), is set in a far future war and climate-ravaged Australia. [Twitter]

“No Problem Too Big”

Mother of Invention author Jo Anderton talks to Adam Hulbert on the inaugural “No Problem Too Big” podcast.

The topic? Artificial intelligence and killer robots. We think it’s timely!

Announcing Mother of Invention

Alex Pierce interviews Mother of Invention editors Tansy Rayner Roberts and Rivqa Rafael about the forthcoming project and how it will be funded.